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20130101
20130131
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
.k., the british finance minister, george osbo e osborne, wants the e.u. to toughen bank regulation across the 27 member states. britain's set plans in motion to separate retail investment decisions in part on proposals from the finnish central bank governor. the fed is also reportedly considering a plan to help banks avoid costly regulations aimed at preventing derivatives trading from being subsidized by taxpayers. the "financial times" says it stems from the lincoln amendment, included in the 2010 dodd-frank law. it prohibits banks that have access to federal deposit insurance or fed credit from acting as derivatives dealers. u.s. banks will still be able to trade some products like interest rate swaps. under the rule, foreign banks would be forced to move their u.s. derivatives activities off their books. >> yeah. if you followed that, you get a gold star this morning. it's a tricky one. >> there's a law that means foreign banks will have problems trading derivatives in the united states. >> charlie, any thoughts here? >> you know, it's part of this broad regulatory framework being put in pla
results in europe look set for a change. the eu muniea explains his investigation into the search engine. he's convinced google is profiting by diverting internet traffic for certain businesses. >>> american skres announced better-than-expected earnings for the fourth quarter. it saw revenues of $8.4 had billion. it will make big restructuring changes which includes 5,400 job cuts throughout the quarter. shares dipped in extended hours of trading the. >>> and the fate of superman remains firmly with warner brothers and dc comics after a decision from a california court. the court of appeals said that the rights for the man of appeals should not stay with the cocreators. the decision means that warner can release this summer's new superman reboot without fear of legal challenges. so we're watching today. who is your favorite hee roar? superman, ironman, super mario draghi? whoever you like, e-mail us, tweet us. my produces asked me who i thought my favorite super hero was. it took my a while to think about it, but then i thought hong kong fooey. there you go. many happy memories. talking
%, the transport budget by 15% and the police budget by 20%, how can we even be giving up on a cut in the e.u. budget before the negotiations have begun? >> we have to make cuts in budgets, because we're dealing with a record debt and deficit. but if he wants to talk about consistency, perhaps he can explain why his own members of the european parliament voted against the budget freeze that we achieved last year? perhaps he can explain why the socialist group in the european parliament that he's such a proud member of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget? and while they're at it, they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his policy? >> the reality is this: he can't convince anyone on europe. last year he announced out of the december negotiations with a veto and the agreement went ahead anyway. you've thrown in the towel even before these negotiations have begun. he can't convince european leaders, he can't even convince his own back benchers. he is weak abroad, he is weak at home
, it is now the e.u. state that is coming up to the first of march deadline of the current e.u. whether they will want to amend that in any way. it could be amended to apply to the regime and not to the opposition forces but it could be amended in many other ways. as a that would require the agreement of all of the states. >> in the syrian opposition i'm interested to know if that could be linked but not lethal. how serious is this embargo and is it possible for example the communications equipment that could be used in conjunction with turkey and some other countries to the elements in your possession. >> well, it's not military. it's certainly not legal. the systems so far include some things like the deployment on the stabilization defense to work with the opposition on the future plans and how they are getting help for people's basic needs and oppositions and training the citizens. we are providing each other actable material in the kits and generators to help civilians in opposition the communications equipment to help activists overcome the communications, blackouts, blockages pro
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
to respond. they have not taken any decisions beyond that. it is now for a eu states coming up at the 12th of march deadline whether or not they want to amend that in any way. it could be an unmanned -- amended so it would apply to the regime and not to opposition forces. it could be amended in many other ways. it would require the agreement of all member states. >> i understand we are already supplying equipment to elements within the surreal -- syria opposition. i am interested to know, that could be military. how strict is this embargo? is it possible if we are giving communications equipment that could be used a in conjunction with weaponry supplied by turkey? or some other countries to elements within the opposition? >> it is not military. it is certainly not lethal. the assistance includes things like the deployment of our response team to work with their opposition on their future plans. how they are getting help to people with basic needs. we are training through citizen journalist. we are providing water purification hits and generators to help civilians. -- water purification kit
in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over a period of time. when they do happen, they have to look at have they been in line with all their expectations? >> and what's happening with capacity? it's dictated by capacity levels. >> yeah. pnc, capital comes in and out frequently been we are seeing money coming into the insurance sector. as capacity comes in, rates will go down. >> i want to talk about life, but first to cap off what happened with superstorm sandy, it took a while to get a sense of how costly that event was. what's emerging? >> i think most
to hopkinson said this water tastes funny and hopkins said of course it does, it's got a whiskey in it. its e.u. a judge of water. last night and then, you know, he would do these things like -- off in odd note to winston churchill essay deerwood then, happy for dave. how old are you anyway? that's the kind of guy he was. there is another dinner at claridge is in the west end of london and period was hosted by the leaders of the british press, the publishers, the editors, the distinguished writers. churchill wasn't there. hopkins was the guest of honor. and so that journalists would do the lake and what he said that he was asked to make some after dinner remarks and he went around the table, speaking softly, looking at a set, shiny and 86. he gave them the sons that while america was not yet in the war, she was marching to save them in the british old. and then one of the journalists wrote, we are happy then all. her courage and confidence have been stimulated by a contact, which shakespearean henry the fifth had a phrase, a little touch of harry mma. the hopkins touches not know, nor was it la
proposals set forth by the u.k. independent commission on banking and the e.u.'s likennen group. indeed, sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has already criticized the u.k. coalition government from backing away from his original proposal while the european commission's recent report summarizing the responses received to the likennen report acknowledges the widespread opposition to the proposal in a charmingly understated fashion, stating: in general banks welcome the group's analysis but argue that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt the proposal wasn't backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for a thorough impact assessment. with all due respect to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, when a regulatory proposal is viewed within the e.u. as being too harsh on a financial industry and harmful to markets, i think it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens with respect to the vickers or likennen proposals, even if all of the
states at 1.4, which means for every dollar you cut, you ha you had e lose $1 340eu in gross domestic product. goildman sax, which is not exactly a left-wing outfit has put it close to 1.5. cut $1, lose $1.50 in gross domestic product. economists at the the university of california have found that during recessions -- and it is important -- during recessions, the fiscal multiplier in developed countries generally falls between 1.5 and 2. that complicated economic gobbledygook boils down to this: $1 in reduced government spending will reduce gross domestic product by more than $1 -- by $1 340eu or $1.70 or whatever the multiplier is, and damages the economy without accomplishing the intended deficit reduction. other countries teame attemptedt austerity -- spain, greece, and portugal particularly have persistent double-dynel i think unemployment -- double-digit unemployment, over 126% i 26% in and greece, and they have anemic or negative economic growth rates. contrast that with the u.s. where a more balanced approach to the economic crisis yielded an unemployment rate that is still far
saying you're special, but only special if you stay at the heart of the eu. they're under pressure to renegotiation the relationship with brussels. but the u.s. assistant secretary said such a plan would have major consequences. as chairman of the business in europe outlined on cnbc last night. >> we don't want to run the risk of trying to set the bar too high in the sense that there's some fantastic renegotiation we can have where we can cherry pick the bits we like, get rid of the bits we don't, because the chances of that happening are probably close to zero. so we don't want to see any risk in our membership. we want more reform by absolutely we do. we made that very clear in the letter. but we don't want to risk or membership because our membership is responsible for millions of jobs and underpins our future prosperity. >> so that debate is going to em. at the same time, david, you think the pound is going to come under pressure. it's a triple cocktail that's going to undermine it. what is that? >> yeah. that's the idea we had, we were talking last year about europe rate cuts,
, but we now find that the eu court of justice is hindering progress by bringing into question the validity of the patents protecting research. on behalf of the millions of people in this country who suffer from long-term medical conditions, will the prime minister do what he can to clear this blockage? >> my honorable friend makes an extremely serious point. i will look closely at it, because i think this country has a competitive advantage from our having taken difficult decisions about stem cell research. it is important that we continue to lead in that area -- not only, as my honorable friend says, for economic and scientific reasons, but because we want to make sure that for people with long-term and debilitating conditions, for children with disabilities and other concerns, we crack those problems for the future. without that level of research, i do not believe that we shall. i will look very carefully at what my honorable friend has said and i will write to him with an answer. >> is the prime minister proud of the growth of food banks across this country, including in my constituency
that he felt that american television programming certainly appear in the '70 z, '70s, '0eu89d had a positive event demonstrating american vawms to the world. how do you think the world outside the united states show "24" and "homeland" and what effect do you think -- have you heard anything at all? >> yeah. "24" and "homeland" are extraordinarily popular not just in germany and in the u.k. but also in jordon, turkey, and places you, you know, frankly "24" is a huge knit iran. it's being beamed in illegally by i can't remember the name. >> you're not getting paid for it. >> right. i'm not getting paid for it, no. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. yeah. we heard it from -- [inaudible] >> >> yeah. >> and the actor who plays a character is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking . >> butt thing . >> tracking "homeland" in iran. >> and surprise stunningly popular. statement i have read a few criticisms of the show, and again, to the extend we sort of, i think, make piss people off on every side of the aisle and embraced too. tvs a good thing. i think one thing
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
is referring to lee university singers who hail from the eu -- lee university in tennessee. next is a call from john. john is a naperville, illinois. an independent there. caller: i really enjoyed the inaugural program. in particular, president obama saying we need not choose between those who brought us where we are today and those who stand for where we will be in the future. then i have a question. what is the history behind the flags displayed in front of the white house? host: the white house or the capital? caller: the capital. host: there is information about the flags, which i can get for you, but not immediately. let's listen to a call from iran in georgia. you are on. republican. welcome. caller: i watched the first inauguration and thought it was wonderful. host: today the ceremonies? 2008? caller: the first inauguration he had. my main comments i wanted to make is being a republican, i am almost ashamed to say that. i did vote democratic, and i voted for president obama. the reason i did vote for him is because we need change and things to go on and start getting these people togeth
that everybody's responsible for success and, of course, for 25eu8 -- for failure as well. >> i like to remind people that as brilliant as the uav drone system is, at the end of the day, there has to be someone who tells it where to fly which in many cases, not all cases, is usually a human source. in the hunt for zarqawi, it's clear that the debriefing of a detainee was vitally important to the outcome. and we know from certain movies floating around now that detainee interrogation is a very important issue. and, of course, that raises the question of how you interrogate detainees. in the book you are about as clear as anyone i've ever seen. you say torture is, quote, self-defeating. you describe the very elaborate steps you took to make sure that any detainee in your chain of command was not abused and was housed in a facility of that have, well, it wasn't a five-star hilton, but it was an appropriate facility. and at one point you said to your troops that anyone who was involved in detainee abuse would be court-martialed and expels from the task force. expelled from the task force. why did
saying eu commission, the european union body is basically saying no-go with the deal. it was sproefd to close towards the end of the last year. obviously, hasn't happened. today you can see the shares down 40%. this company is going to need a new ceo, a new strategic vision. and its biggest shareholder down about .3% on the news. fedex declined to comment this morning. now let's turn our attention briefly to this. it gives us a sense of this mentality of the crisis being over, that it's kind of gripped investors to keep hearing the bullish comments we have on people in the program. spain's ten-year still below 5% even though we're seeing prices down this morning and the yield for the ten-year in italy down 4.2. quick look at the euro/dollar which is benefiting here and has been doing pretty well of late. 1.3359. adding another .1%. just for joe, i'm going to skip talking about the yen today and that's in part because the nikkei is closed. back to you guys. >> i thought you were going to reference your -- is that a golden -- were you at the gold b globes? that looks like you paid some
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18